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Susan S. Cady

 

1899

05 02†††††† Miss Birdie Habhegger arrived home Sunday night from her foreign tour, having been absent nearly seven months, during which she travelled extensively in different parts of the Old World, in company with Miss Susan Cady and two Southern ladies.Among the countries visited were Italy, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, France, Greece, Turkey, Egypt and Asia Minor, attention being given to all the chief cities and points of historic interest.Miss Habhegger has been within a vast range of observation and experience, and reports a most delightful trip.She left Miss Cady in Paris, with her health considerably improved. The latter will remain on the other side for some time yet.†† WR

 

1900

Susan S. Cady

1846 - 1900

 

Death of Miss Sue Cady

She Expires This Morning in Hospital at Milwaukee

Had Been Ill Three Weeks

 

Operation for Gall Stones Performed Sunday, April 29

Operation was Successful But Lack of Vitality Resulted In Death

 

Miss Sue Cady died at 1:30 o'clock this morning in St. Mary's hospital in Milwaukee.She went there several weeks ago and three weeks ago an operation for the removal of gall stones was performed.The operation was successfully performed but the vitality of the patient was not sufficient to carry her through the ordeal and death was the result.

 

Deceased was the daughter of Linus R. Cady, a pioneer resident of this city who died fourteen years ago March 18, 1886.Her mother departed life several years before.Miss Cady was born in this city 53 years ago and has always resided here.Since the death of her father she has resided in the family of Col. A. Solliday.

 

Miss Cady was possessed of a character of extraordinary beauty and refinement.Her influence for good was remarkably pronounced, and was acknowledged by all who came in contact with her.Her nature was kind and sympathetic, and her disposition so sunny that wherever she went she carried with her a brightness that was contagious, and which rendered her a beloved favorite with her friends and associates.She was a woman of superior intellectual ability and high literary attainment, and took a spirited interest in all of the notable subjects of the day, upon which she was capable of conversing intelligently and pleasantly.She traveled extensively throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and portions of Asia, and being a thorough student and a keen observer, she acquired a fund of valuable knowledge concerning these lands, people and customs, and was deemed one of the best informed and best read woman in the community.

 

Miss Cady was a loyal friend, a delightful companion, and an interesting acquaintance.She was one of the leading society woman of this city, was versed in all of the artistic ways and accomplishments which tend to make the perfect entertainer, and was the generous patron of all that was progressive and good.And though her life was quite fully occupied with study, social duties and other work, she always found time to devote to the needy, to the helping of others, and relieving distress wherever discovered; and like the true Christian, her charities were dispensed with a quietness and delicacy which made them appear, indeed, like "lending to the Lord."

 

She was a devout and faithful member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, and took an active interest in its welfare and advancement, her life, so pure and sweet, being an edifying example of the efficacy of religion when its precepts are adhered to.

 

Miss Cady will be universally mourned in this city, for having lived here all of her life, she was known to almost everyone and was held in the highest esteem.She had a wide circle of friends by whom she was dearly beloved, and her death will be learned with very great regret.

 

For the past fourteen years or more, Miss Cady made her home with Col. and Mrs. A. Solliday, and though there existed no tie of blood relationship between them, the strength and quality of their affection was unusually great, and her loss is felt by the family as keenly as though she were the nearest of relatives, and the sympathy of the community is extended to Col. Solliday and family.

 

The remains of Miss Cady were brought here this afternoon at 3:32 over the Milwaukee Road and taken to the residence of Colonel A. Solliday in Church Street, from where the funeral will take place Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock to St. Paul's Episcopal Church.

 

The interment will be in Oak Hill Cemetery.

 

Cross References:

†††††††††††††† 1886The chapel at St. Paulís was given by Miss Susan Cady in memory of her parents.